Upcoming IGP Workshop: “Who Governs, States or Stakeholders? Cybersecurity and Internet Governance”

globeOn May 11-12, 2017, the IGP’s 3rd Annual Workshop will convene at Georgia Tech’s School of Public Policy in Atlanta. This year’s topic: Who Governs, States or Stakeholders? Cybersecurity and Internet Governance

Cybersecurity problems challenge existing institutions of governance. Global coordination is impeded by national boundaries, and government-industry cooperation is impeded by public-private distinctions.

Two decades ago similar challenges inhibited Internet governance.  In formalizing Internet identifier assignments, governments, firms, and civil society created novel institutions, most notably ICANN.  Internet governance institutions depart from the traditional sovereignty model to empower non-state actors in a multistakeholder model.

Today the linkage between cybersecurity and national security risks re-establishing the traditional sovereignty model. Yet the factors that led to innovations like ICANN are also present in cybersecurity issues. These include globalized markets for technology and services, a need for cooperation and information sharing across jurisdictions, and the need to avoid fragmentation.

Can cybersecurity also elicit institutional innovations, or will national security concerns lead to a re-territorialization of the Internet? If the latter, what consequences will this have for global Internet governance? Can Internet governance offer lessons and models for institutional solutions to cybersecurity problems? This workshop will explore these questions.

Confirmed participants include:

  • Peter Swire, Huang Professor and former member of the White House Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies,
  • General Philip Breedlove, former Supreme Allied Commander Europe of NATO,
  • Dr. Milton Mueller, Professor of Public Policy at Georgia Tech;
  • Hans Klein, Associate Professor of Public Policy at Georgia Tech.

3 comments

  1. Richard Hill

    Dear Brenden,

    Thank you for this, but the statement “In formalizing Internet identifier assignments, governments, firms, and civil society created novel institutions, most notably ICANN.” does not quit match the historical reality, well described in Milton’s book Ruling the Root.

    ICANN was created by a unilateral act of the US government, which decided not to implement the recommendations of what today would be called a multi-stakeholder process, the IAHC.

    Best,
    Richard